Nation & World News

Snowden’s Flight To Russia May Not Have Been Such A Shock

By Mark Memmott on August 27th, 2013

Did “NSA leaker” Edward Snowden really surprise Russian officials when he showed up at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo Airport on June 23?

Maybe not.

The Associated Press writes that, according to the Russian newspaper Kommersant, a Russian goverment official says that “Snowden appeared at the Russian Consulate in Hong Kong on his own initiative two days before the flight, showed his Aeroflot ticket and asked for help.”

The Washington Post adds that Kommersant also says Snowden, “spent several days living at the Russian Consulate in Hong Kong” before his flight to Moscow.

The report raises questions about Russian President Vladimir Putin’s claim that Snowden’s decision to go to Moscow was a “complete surprise” to Russian authorities.

Kommersant‘s reporting also sheds some new light on what happened on July 11 when there was much speculation that Snowden would be on a flight from Moscow to Havana. The AP writes that Kommersant:

“Citing several ‘informed’ sources, said that Cuba informed Russia that the Aeroflot flight from Moscow would not be allowed to land in Havana if Snowden were on board, citing pressure from the United States. A source identified as someone ‘close to the State Department’ confirmed to the paper that Cuba was among a number of countries that had been warned not to provide assistance to Snowden.”

Snowden is the former National Security Agency contractor who The Guardian and The Washington Post say has been the source of leaks about NSA surveillance programs that they have reported about. He’s been given temporary asylum in Russia. The U.S., which hopes to prosecute Snowden, wants to see him extradited. Snowden and his supporters say he’s a whistle blower who has exposed wrong-doing.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Passengers Morgan Griffin, 20, left, and his brother, Eric Crandell 12, browse their mobile devices as they await to board The Amtrak Pacific Surfliner train bound to Santa Barbara, Calif., at Union Station in Los Angeles, on Wednesday. Snow and rain in the east has snarled holiday travel, but by Thanksgiving day, things looked to be improving.

Holiday Travel Snarls Look To Be Easing

AAA says some 46 million Americans will travel more than 50 miles for Thanksgiving — the largest number since 2007.


Author P.D. James, whose publisher says died at age 94.

British Mystery Novelist P.D. James Dies At 94

The author of such books as The Black Tower was best-known for her series featuring Scotland Yard detective Adam Dalgliesh.


An illustrated turkey on a football field.

3 NFL Games On Tap To Satisfy Thanksgiving Football Fans

It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without football. The Chicago Bears face the Detroit Lions, the Philadelphia Eagles take on the Dallas Cowboys, and the Seattle Seahawks play the San Francisco 49ers.


Snow falls Wednesday night as Missouri National Guard members stand outside of the Ferguson Police Department in Ferguson, Mo.

In Ferguson And Across The Country, Protests Are More Subdued

Only about 30 demonstrators were out Wednesday night in Ferguson, NPR’s Elise Hu reports, and there were only a handful of sizable protests across the country.


The US Capitol building as seen from the Cannon House Office Building in Washington.

Judge Rules Fewer Political Groups Can Keep Their Donors Secret

The ruling targets the funders of campaign issue ads that encourage viewers to choose a specific candidate. The FEC now must decide whether it will appeal the ruling or require more disclosure.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments