Nation & World News

Reports: Mubarak Might Be Freed While Awaiting New Trial

By Mark Memmott on August 19th, 2013

As fears of civil war rise in Egypt, there are these reports that:

— “Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president overthrown in an uprising in 2011, will be released from jail soon after a prosecutor cleared him in a corruption case, his lawyer and a judicial source said on Monday.” (Reuters)

— “Egyptian judiciary officials say former President Hosni Mubarak could be freed from custody this week. They say a court on Monday ordered his release in a corruption case that alleged he and his two sons embezzled funds for presidential palaces.” (The Associated Press)

NPR Cairo bureau chief Leila Fadel notes that the 85-year-old former president is still being charged in the deaths of protesters during the 2011 demonstrations that led to the toppling of his regime. He also still faces corruption charges. So even if he is released, he’s still set to be tried.

Reuters reminds readers that “Mubarak, along with his interior minister, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison last year for failing to stop the killing of protesters in the revolt that swept him from power. He still faces a retrial in that case after appeals from the prosecution and defense, but this would not necessarily require him to stay in jail.”

Meanwhile, Egypt’s first democratically elected president — Mohammed Morsi — remains out of sight. He was ousted by the military last month and has been held since then. He’s being investigated for alleged conspiracy and murder.

Since last Wednesday, when government forces moved to clear Morsi’s supporters from sites where they had been protesting his removal from office, more than 900 Egyptians have died and thousands more have been wounded in clashes.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Justice Department Won’t Charge IRS’ Lois Lerner With Criminal Contempt

At issue is whether the former IRS official waived her Fifth Amendment rights when she made an opening statement proclaiming her innocence over the agency’s targeting of conservative groups.


Sen. Robert Menendez, a Democrat from New Jersey.

Sen. Robert Menendez Indicted On Corruption Charges

The indictment alleges that Menendez abused his office to benefit a friend and donor. The New Jersey senator has always maintained his innocence.


Morning traffic makes its way toward downtown Los Angeles along the Hollywood Freeway past an electronic sign warning of severe drought. California Gov. Jerry Brown introduced the state's first mandatory water reduction measure this week.

California Governor Issues 1st-Ever Statewide Mandatory Water Restrictions

Cities in drought-stricken California will have to reduce their water usage by 25 percent. In a news conference, Gov. Jerry Brown said the “historic drought demands unprecedented action.”


Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi (left) tours Tikrit after it was retaken by security forces Wednesday, a key step in driving the militants out of their biggest strongholds.

Iraq Claims Victory Over Militants In Strategic City Of Tikrit

Iraqi flags are flying over government buildings again, one month into a major offensive to reclaim the city from fighters with the self-proclaimed Islamic State.


Madison, Wis., Council Votes To Ban Discrimination Against Atheism

In what’s believed to be a first in the United States, the city’s equal opportunities ordinance is amended “to add nonreligion as a protected class.”


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments