Nation & World News

Venezuela And Nicaragua Willing To Give Asylum To Snowden

By Dana Farrington on July 6th, 2013

The presidents of Venezuela and Nicaragua have said they would be willing to give asylum to Edward Snowden, The Associated Press and other media report.

Snowden, who has leaked secret information about National Security Agency programs, is believed to be holed up in a Moscow airport.

Snowden has petitioned for asylum in several countries, and Friday the website WikiLeaks tweeted that he had applied to six more. It would not name which ones “due to attempted US interference.”

According to Reuters, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro said he had “decided to offer humanitarian asylum” to Snowden “so that in the fatherland of (Simon) Bolivar and (Hugo) Chavez, he can come and live away from the imperial North American persecution.”

President Daniel Ortega of Nicaragua says he would give Snowden asylum “if circumstances permit it,” the BBC reports.

The announcements follow an incident Tuesday in which Bolivian President Evo Morales’ plane was forced to land in Austria, apparently on suspicion Snowden was onboard. Morales returned to support from fellow Latin American leaders, who denounced the disruption.

NPR’s Lourdes Garcia-Navarro told host Renee Montagne on Morning Edition the countries have “called it a violation of national sovereignty, an act of imperialism.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.


More Stories in News from NPR

An image from aerial footage of flood damage in South Carolina.

18 Dams Breached And Death Toll Rises In S.C. Flooding

As he announced those conditions this morning — and showed a live picture of downtown Columbia under sunny skies — TV meteorologist Tim Miller got a bit emotional.

Security and police officers help Pierre Plissonnier, an executive in Air France's long-haul flight unit, to climb over a fence after several hundred employees stormed into the offices of Air France on Monday.

After Employees Mob Air France Executives, French Government Gets Involved

Executives were taking part in meetings about how the company would slash nearly 3,000 jobs when hundreds of workers stormed the Air France offices Monday.

FAA Proposes $1.9 Million Fine Against Photo Company Over Drone Use

The Federal Aviation Administration said it was the largest civil penalty the agency has ever proposed after drone use allegedly endangered airspace safety.

An image from the Draft Kings website shows the range of fantasy games they run — with payouts of thousands of dollars at stake.

Fantasy Sports Sites Face Questions About Games’ Integrity

Two leading fantasy sports companies are promising to protect “the integrity of the games” they offer customers, after an employee released lineup information early.

"This is unacceptable," NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said of Russian military aircraft violating Turkey's airspace. NATO defense ministers will meet Thursday to discuss the situation.

Russian Warplane Incursions In Turkey Are ‘Unacceptable,’ NATO Chief Says

Turkey says that on Sunday, a MiG-29 plane kept two of its F-16 jets on its radar as potential targets for more than five minutes.

Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Underwriting Payments