Nation & World News

Egypt’s Morsi Says He Won’t Step Down, Defies Army’s Demand

By Bill Chappell on July 3rd, 2013

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET. Morsi Addresses The Nation:

In a broadcast speech Tuesday night, President Mohammed Morsi refused to step down, saying it would undermine the legitimacy of the country’s constitution.

“Legitimacy is the linchpin for security,” he said. “It is the only guarantee that no violence can be embraced.”

The BBC reports Morsi “admitted he had made mistakes, pledging his loyalty to the people but urging protesters to remain peaceful, insisting he would not be dictated to.”

On Monday, the Egyptian Army urged the country’s first democratically elected president to reach a compromise with his opponents by Wednesday. In his speech Tuesday, Morsi called on the army to withdraw its ultimatum.

Our Original Post Continues:

If Egypt’s President Mohammed Morsi can’t reach a compromise with his political opponents by Wednesday’s deadline, the country’s military plans to suspend Egypt’s constitution, dissolve the legislature and appoint an interim leadership, according to multiple reports.

The military’s plans for what might happen if Wednesday’s deadline passes without an agreement was presented in rough outlines Tuesday by state media and other news outlets. The deadline will pass Wednesday afternoon in Egypt — around late morning on the U.S. East Coast.

Morsi is calling for the military to rescind its demands, saying on his Twitter account Tuesday night that he will “hold on to constitutional legitimacy,” the news site Ahram Online reports.

A communications adviser for the president tells NPR’s Laila Fadel in Cairo today that Morsi has no plans to resign, saying that a coup would set a dangerous precedent.

Demonstrations by millions of protesters Sunday prompted Egypt’s military to give Morsi an ultimatum Monday. Those protests are continuing this week, as Morsi’s opponents and his supporters in the Muslim Brotherhood party take to the streets.

“Clashes broke out around pro-Morsi marches in several parts of the capital and a string of cities to the north and south,” the AP reports. “Morsi opponents stormed Brotherhood offices in two towns. At least 16 have been killed since Sunday in clashes, most of them anti-Morsi protesters shot to death by Islamists.”

As protests continued today, at least seven people have died clashes, CNN reports, citing state media.

And an Egyptian appeals court says Morsi acted improperly when he fired former Prosecutor General Abdel Maguid Mahmoud, a move made when he issued a constitutional declaration late in 2012. That declaration intensified clashes between the president and the judicial branch. At this time, it remains unclear whether Mahmoud will be reinstated. The Supreme Judicial Council is expected to clarify matters Wednesday.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Arrested For Resisting Arrest — Yes, It’s Possible

Resisting arrest is usually a secondary charge against someone already being arrested for something else, but not always.


A 2011 Subaru Legacy is among the nine vehicles that were found to have zero driver fatalities in a new report by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

Car Safety Improves: Study Lists Those With Most, And Least, Driver Deaths

For 2011 models through the 2012 calendar year, driver deaths per million registered vehicle years fell to 28 from 48 just three years earlier, says the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.


David Silva, who owed about $30,000 in court fines and fees, says that a lot of his financial burden fell on his family and friends.

Study Finds Court Fees Also Punish The Families Of Those Who Owe

The Center for Community Alternatives says that formerly incarcerated men and women rely heavily upon family, almost always receiving cash from them.


Dartmouth College President Philip Hanlon speaks Thursday to faculty and students about changes planned for the Ivy League school. Dartmouth banned hard liquor on campus and said all students will have to take part in a sexual violence prevention program all four years they are enrolled at the Ivy League school.

Dartmouth Bans Hard Liquor On Campus

The Ivy League school is also introducing a mandatory four-year sexual violence prevention and education program for students. The steps are part of efforts to reform social life at the college.


Genetically modified rice plants are shown in a lab in 2006. A new report from Pew Research shows a wide gap between perceptions of safety of GM foods between scientists and the general public.

Scientists, General Public Have Divergent Views On Science, Report Says

A Pew Research Center study shows that the two groups disagree most strongly on the safety of GM foods, the use of animals in research, climate change and human evolution.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments