Nation & World News

Ecuador Backs Off NSA Leaker Snowden, Citing Asylum Rules

By Bill Chappell on July 1st, 2013

The fate of “NSA leaker” Edward Snowden is still uncertain, as he seeks asylum while being pursued by U.S. authorities. A week ago, Snowden began a journey from Hong Kong to a “third country,” possibly Ecuador, and he remains in limbo at a Moscow airport.

From Moscow, NPR’s Corey Flintoff reports for our Newscast unit that neither Ecuador nor Russia has brought clarity to Snowden’s situation:

“Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa told The Associated Press on Sunday that Snowden is in the hands of the Russian authorities and cannot leave a Moscow airport transit area without their consent.

“Correa said Ecuador can’t consider an asylum request from the 30-year-old intelligence analyst unless he applies in Ecuador or at an Ecuadoran Embassy.

“Meanwhile, a spokesman for Russian President Vladimir Putin said that Snowden is not on the Kremlin’s agenda.

“Dmitri Peskov did say, however, that Russian authorities would take into account requests from Russian groups that want the government to grant Snowden asylum in Russia.”

Officials from Iceland, named as another possible destination for Snowden, have also said that anyone seeking asylum must be in the country or at one of its embassies.

Late last week, Ecuadorean officials declared that travel papers from their country that promised Snowden’s safe passage were not valid, The Associated Press reported.

The United States has revoked Snowden’s passport. The former NSA contractor has received advice from WikiLeaks, the group whose founder, Julian Assange, remains holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. As Mark reported Sunday, Assange says Snowden “is a hero.”

Monday, Secretary of State John Kerry says he believes China’s help would have “made a difference” in the case of Snowden, who was hiding in Hong Kong when classified documents he had provided to the media were published.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

This entry was posted in News from NPR. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.

 

More Stories in News from NPR

Former Massey Energy Company Chairman and CEO Don Blankenship, seen in July 2010, has pleaded not guilty to conspiracy charges associated with the 2010 West Virginia mine explosion that killed 29 men.

U.S. Appeals Court Overturns Gag Order In Mine Disaster Case

Dozens of news organizations, including NPR, appealed after a judge issued the gag order in a criminal case involving ex-Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship and the 2010 Upper Big Branch mine disaster.


Plane Skids Off Runway At New York’s LaGuardia; No Injuries

The Delta Air Lines flight inbound from Atlanta slid off the runway and into a fence on the side of the tarmac. There were no immediate reports of injuries.


Michael Brown’s Family Will File Civil Suit Over His Death

The news comes a day after the Justice Department cleared Officer Darren Wilson, who shot and killed Brown, in a civil rights probe — and gave a scathing appraisal of the Ferguson Police Department.


British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a news conference on her documentary India's Daughter on Tuesday. The film, which has been banned in India, was broadcast Wednesday in the U.K. — a decision that has angered the Indian government.

India Threatens BBC Over Decision To Air Rape Documentary In U.K.

The government, which has banned the Indian media from broadcasting India’s Daughter or even showing clips from it pending an investigation, also ordered YouTube to take down the documentary.


In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is depicted sitting in federal court in Boston on Dec. 18, 2014, for a pretrial hearing. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. He could face the death penalty if convicted.

Second-Day Proceedings Under Way In Boston Marathon Trial

Jurors will hear more testimony in the trial of Dzhokar Tsarnaev, the accused bomber, a day after a dramatic admission of guilt and often-heartbreaking accounts from victims of the deadly 2013 attack.


Thank you for your support

WUFT depends on the support of our community — people like you — to help us continue to provide quality programming to North Central Florida.
Become a Sustainer
I want to support FM 89.1/NPR
I want to support Florida's 5/PBS
Donate a Vehicle
Day Sponsorship Payments
Underwriting Payments